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AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT


Agriculture Sustainability

FreshPoint is taking a leading role in support of a new vision for agricultural practices designed to protect the land and environment. This new vision is a result of farming practices that began in post World War II America. At that time, global demand for agricultural commodities placed increased pressure on agricultural practices. Productivity gains were increased by greater mechanization and utilization of new technologies, including increased chemical use and specialized farming practices that favored maximized production. Unintentional and unfortunate consequences were the result. Soil erosion, chemical contamination of the aquifer and waterways, and higher levels of pesticide residual. Additional social ramifications include the decline in the number of family farms and the economic and social erosion of rural communities.

It is FreshPoint's goal to ensure that highly differentiated products are successfully produced for our future generations. To that end, our ultimate goal is to foster the success of highly differentiated products that are profitable to all participants and incorporate farmer ownership and control.

Through a series of initiatives, FreshPoint is contributing to environmental stewardship and rural social vitality.


AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT

AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT


Integrated Pest Management

Integrated Pest Management promotes the protection of environmentally sensitive growing areas, soil and water conservation, as well as the prudent management of crop pests and herbicide use.  The goal of this program is the use of environmentally friendly pesticides, only as necessary.  Efforts like this are not easy, but programs similar to this in Peru and Chile have realized a  65% reduction in pesticide use.  One of our major suppliers developed a “Bug Vac,” a huge vacuum cleaner on a tractor, to suck up tiny bugs hovering over Strawberry plants.  This helped reduce pesticide use by over 50%.  Bartlett Pear growers in California learned that by spraying female pharmones into their orchards, male coddling moths would go crazy looking for the girls instead of causing damage to Pear tree leaves.  For some Bartlett Pear growers, this helped completely eliminate pesticide use for the coddling moth, the largest pest for their crop.  We are convinced through these efforts and leadership, we will make a huge impact toward a more sustainable food supply.


Our Morning Commute Begins At Midnight

For many of our companies, our first trucks are leaving while you’re just going to bed.  By keeping our delivery fleet out of stop-and-go morning traffic jams, it helps us reduce fossil fuel use and also helps reduce air pollution.  Many of our delivery trucks are back at our warehouse before the morning commute even starts.


AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT

AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT


Buying Local

It is clear that FreshPoint’s leadership in buying local can have an impact.  Many of our local companies have been supporting local family farms for a long time.  It’s not just about supporting a family farmer because they are a family farmer, but because they are farming right.  Many customers want to know where their foods are produced…and who produced them. This “local” attitude is creating a growing market for natural and organic foods, grown and produced locally and supplied through our existing local food system.  Buy local and sell fresh.  It’s a philosophy that FreshPoint companies has not only believed in, but helped create.  Many of our customers are now providing their customers with exciting menu alternatives featuring locally produced foods.


AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT


Buying Organic

North America used to be a land of farmers, but now, less than two percent of the population grows the food and fiber we need to live.  We are at least four generations away from the family farm, which simply means the vast majority of people don't know a lot about what it takes to grow food.  There is a revolution happening in the farm fields and on the dinner tables of North America -- a revolution that is transforming the very nature of the food we eat.  Organic farming and foods.

The use of chemicals has allowed farmers to produce far more food on far less land, helping to provide the cheapest food for a hungry world.  Chemicals are an important tool used by the farmer in keeping the food supply strong and food prices steady.  But those chemicals can contaminate food, as well as land and water resources and are also a risk to farm workers.
FreshPoint supports efforts by farmers large and small, in reducing their use of pesticides.  It begins by developing new seed varieties that are resistant to pests and diseases.  It also begins with farmers setting aside acreage for use of Organic farming.  Organic farming relies on ecologically based practices, such as cultural and biological pest management, and virtually exclude the use of synthetic chemicals in crop production.

Many family farmers, both large and small, have the experience and are conscientious about natural eco-systems and sustainability.  These farmers are leading the way in Organic farming.  The philosophy is simple:  The health of plants, soil, livestock and people are interrelated.  Organic farming is a fundamental approach based on understanding and working with natural systems rather than trying to control them.

Sustainable agriculture is often defined in many ways, but ultimately it seeks to sustain farmers, resources and communities by promoting farming practices and methods that are profitable, environmentally sound and good for communities.  For example, in the irrigated desert of Southern California, producers and researchers, collaborating in a Research and Education grant, found that cowpea plowed down as a green manure and used as mulch in reduced tillage systems increased yields and reduced weeds and nematodes.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the word “organic” was starting to be used by more than just the left over hippie generation.  Organic could become mainstream, but there were major hurdles.  The first was very inefficient distribution channels.  Aside from a roadside stand or a farmer’s market, organic farmers just didn’t have means to distribute their organic products.  The second was price.  Farmers had to become certified as organic and to do that, land had to be not in use as conventional farmland for 3 years.  That greatly reduced the amount of land available for organic farming.  Over the years however, many more thousands of acres are now coming into production as organic farmland, and that has meant increased supplies of many different fruits and vegetables.  To help bring clarity to the organic world, the USDA developed a national standard for organic in its National Organic Program.

Can North America produce all of its food with organic farming?  The most recent studies by the University of California at Davis concludes that in order for farmers to produce just at their current levels, then every acre of land in the United States would have to be farmed.  That just isn’t feasible.  It would cause too much disruption in the steady supply and pricing of food.

Over the last decade, however, FreshPoint has supported organic farmers, not only by buying their products, but also by helping them with marketing exposure and providing a broader distribution channel.  We buy organic when and where possible. And we don’t buy just because it’s organic.  We buy because they are farming right and producing good products.

We have worked at increasing education and awareness, helping to create stronger demand in the foodservice and retail marketplace, knowing that as demand for organically-produced foods increases, more farmers would grow organics, thereby increasing supplies and making organic produce more accessible.

Many of our FreshPoint companies have supported local economies and farms by buying from local organic farmers.  That doesn’t mean we lower our standards of quality or food safety.  Just the opposite.  We have helped many local, organic farmers meet those standards.

Fowler & Huntting in Hartford, Connecticut has been one of the leaders in providing locally-grown organic produce to many of the Northeast’s largest retailers and foodservice operators. 

Lee Ray-Tarantino in San Francisco has been supporting locally-grown organic farmers for several decades.  Northern California’s Napa Valley and Bay Area is the epicenter of organic farming.  Lee Ray-Tarantino has helped many of these farmers reach some of the finest chefs in North America.

FreshPoint Southern California, with its “Produce Hunter” brand has supported many of the nation’s best organic family farmers, bringing some of the most unique fruits and vegetables to the most respected chefs in California and around North America.

Piranha Produce in Modesto, California is one of many FreshPoint companies that has become certified to handle Organic fruits and vegetables, helping to distribute the bounty of San Joaquin Valley organic farming to retail, foodservice, school districts and universities.


AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT

AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT


Good Food. Good For You. Good For The Earth.

We love being green.  Been green since our very beginning.  Avocado green.  Kiwifruit green.  We’re really into green…and greens.  So when it comes to being green for the environment, it’s just part of what we do.  It’s a part of who we are.  As one of the largest companies in the world, with an expanding North American and global presence, environmental problems are our problems. The supply of fresh, natural products can only be sustained if the ecosystems that provide them are protected.  There are not two worlds out there, a FreshPoint world and some other world. We believe that being a good steward of the environment and in our communities and being an efficient and profitable business are not mutually exclusive. They are one and the same.  It’s not just about being green for green’s sake.  It’s about doing things in a smarter way.  That ultimately benefits the customers we serve and the communities in which we live and work. It simply makes us a better company...for a better time.


AGRICULTURE SUSTAINABILITY
BUYING ORGANIC
BUYING LOCAL
ECO EFFICIENT INITIATIVES
OUR ENVIRONMENT