Filtered by: Food Safety Standards


From ancient low-tech to modern day high-tech, the power of corn

From the summer grill to your holiday centerpiece, corn is perhaps the most versatile crop grown today. It’s also one of the oldest and most sacred crops grown in the world. Thought to have been first cultivated 8,700 years in Mexico’s Central Balsas River Valley, corn, or maize, became a critically important food crop.  Why?...

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Maria Elisa Vollmer

Apprentice Diary: Week One—Integrating a passion for sustainability

When we talk about sustainability, we don’t just mean the environment—our employees are our greatest asset and the foundation to our great success. We work with internships, local schools and colleges for placement, and various in-house leadership programs throughout the year, developing people with a passion for produce. In this diary series, Maria Elisa Vollmer...

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The best tasting, sweetest corn we’ve found

The corn grown in the Brentwood area of California’s Sacramento River Delta is the best tasting, sweetest corn we’ve found. Known as Brentwood corn, this product has the well-deserved reputation across the country as the benchmark against which all other corn is measured. However, all Brentwood corn is not created equal! Over the past eight...

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Phil talks to us about the perfect piece of stone fruit, Georgia peaches.

Can this be the perfect piece of stone fruit?

  Today we’re going to talk about Georgia peaches. These peaches are from Pearson Farm in Fort Valley, Georgia. In my opinion, they’re the perfect piece of stone fruit. They have a very thin skin, the mixture of acidity and sweetness is almost perfect—not too sweet, not overly mushy, not too acidic, not too hard… this...

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How to win summer: cold soup

Want to win at summer? Try cold soup. Soup is the quintessential comfort food for many people; yet, it’s often relegated to the fall and winter seasons and is often hearty and warming. So what about summer soups? There is a long and varied history of cold soup in many parts of the world, including...

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Florida Lychee

Florida Lychee: limited season, limitless flavor

We are super excited that lychee are now in season. On the outside here you can see why some people would call them the Chinese strawberry, because it looks like a strawberry, with a bumpy leathery skin, but on the inside we have this perfumy, flowery, aromatic (flesh), that looks like a little peeled grape....

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A Remarkable Tomato Partnership

Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee recognizes Sysco and FreshPoint as a Harvester of Hope Vision Partner.  The partnership between Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee and Sysco/FreshPoint goes back almost 26 years with consistent gifts of food and funds that have impacted thousands of food insecure individuals in Middle and West Tennessee....

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Carrot tops, one chef’s trash is another chef’s pesto.

I’ve said it before…I love cooking with “trash!” I still haven’t found a use for the white pith on a pepper, lemon seeds, or the twist tie that holds baby vegetables together, but I can use just about anything else. In my line if work, I don’t only get to cook with delicious vegetables, but...

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You haven’t had asparagus until you’ve had Zuckerman’s

“Doing cartwheels of joy!” — The Produce Hunter The California Sacramento River Delta boasts exceptionally rich peat soil. This magnificent soil and the area’s climate combine to grow what many people consider the world’s best asparagus. In 2004, Russ Parsons’ prescient article about the state of California’s asparagus crop, Delicate Harvest in Crisis, ran in...

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How to get the most bang for your buck with herbs

Question: Herbs are perishable, how can I get the most bang for my buck with my herbs? Let’s talk about the magic of your freezer Your springtime bounty can be kept for weeks or months just with the magic of olive oil and your freezer. Blend up extra herbs and freeze them in ice cube...

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Local Farm Spotlight with Tom West Blueberries

Local Farm Spotlight: Tom West Blueberries Tom West Blueberries is a 20-acre farm in Ocoee, FL. After World War II, Tom West returned to Ocoee, Florida, and began growing and harvesting citrus. Later, in 1954 he incorporated to Tom West Inc. In 1964, Tom was joined by his son Milton West in the citrus farming...

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Local Farm Spotlight with Lady Moon Farms

Farm Spotlight: Lady Moon Farms Lady Moon Farms is a 2,400-acre farm in Punta Gorda, FL growing items such as lettuce. With a dream to live in the country, smell the fresh air and see the stars at night, Tom Beddard founded Lady Moon Farms in 1988 with his wife Christine on five acres in...

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Think Color and Variety for American Heart Month

It’s American Heart Month. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. How do fruits and veggies play a role with heart disease? The American Heart Association encourages you to be Healthy For Good™ with their few simple steps: Eat Smart: Make healthy, delicious choices wherever and whenever you eat. Add Color: Make...

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Food Waste Morphs Into an Addictive Crispy Snack

You’ve done all your prep work, and now you have a rather large pile of root vegetable scraps—ends, leaves, peelings, and small pieces. Instead of tossing them as food waste, what about roasting them in the oven for a crispy snack? Toss your scraps with a little oil, season, and with the magic of the...

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Microgreens are the perfect garnish for your Valentine's menu.

Focus on Colorful Garnishes this Valentine’s Day

What edible flowers lack in flavor, they make up for it with vibrant, happy color. Edible flowers are a beautiful way to add a pop of color. Use them whole as colorful garnishes, add a few to a glass of champagne or a cocktail, or break apart the flowers into an edible confetti and sprinkle...

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